Mr. U.N. Owen

One of the main characters in And Then There Were None, is Mr. U. N. Owen. Just who is Mr. U N Owen?  Why did or did not the murderer's "confession" seem fitting and appropriate to you?  Why do you believe Mr. U.N. Owen created this plot? Explain your reasoning with support from the novel.  PLEASE PROOF READ YOUR RESPONSES BEFORE POSTING, and remember to respond in complete and grammatically correct sentences.

11 comments:

  1. Mr. U.N. Owen was an unidentified person who was the one presumed to have invited guests by letter to come to a mysterious island off the coast of Devon. He cleverly worded the letters so that the guests would accept his invitation. At first he wasn’t suspected to be any one of them on the island, but eventually they realized it must be a guest after a complete search of the island. The way he masked his identity was unsuspecting and made everyone wonder who he was until their deaths. He was so discreet even his name was “unknown.” The way he presented himself was mysterious as he carefully “calculated” every detail of every death. He chose to make himself known in a very risky but clever way. It was risky because Justice Wargrave may have never gotten credit if the bottle was not found with his confession in it. His announcement was clever because all the murders would be done by the time it was discovered. It was fitting to confess because he wanted to go down in history like one of the other great murder mysteries he had listened to in court and always “fantasized” about. Mr. U.N. Owen created the plot because it was his “desire to act instead of to judge.” He could gain his true recognition as a brilliant murderer that linked him to his entire “art collection of victims.” He created a plot based off of the sick desires of his imagination and used his knowledge as a judge to carry out his plan.

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    1. Preston, I agree with fully on your answer. Mr. Wargrave always wanted to act and to bring justice to cases that do not break the laws, but he finds that are punishable crimes.

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    2. Preston, if you look back through the book, you may be able to pick up clues that it is indeed him, as in the beginning he proclaims by a stretch of imagination, that U.N.Owen, also means UNKNOWN. Isn't that a little suspicious?

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    3. Preston, I agree that Mr. U.N. Owen worded the invitations in a way that assured the guests would accept. He was very cunning, yet brilliant, to keep his identity a secret so that no one suspected him to be one of the guests. Mr. U.N. Owen made his every move very carefully and used his experiences as a judge to complete his plan of murdering people who he thought deserved to die as punishment for their previous crimes. I also agree with you that the way he confessed to being the killer was risky. He had no guarantee that the bottle with his confession in it would ever be found. For someone who was so calculated throughout the novel, it surprised me that he would confess in a way that left it up to fate if he would ever be recognized as the murderer.

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    4. Preston, I agree with you completely on your response, The way Wargrave masked his identity was unsuspecting. No one expected him to be Mr. U.N. Owen because he was always the one who questioned and tested the others by asking what they were doing the night/morning when a person died. He used his previous skills as being a judge to test everyone else. This made the characters sidetracked and therefore, they never thought of him to be the murderer.

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    5. Preston, I totally agree with you. Justice Wargrave was very calculating and clever on how he brought the plot together and killing everyone. He stepped up to find the killer to turn the focus of everyone from suspecting him. Though he does talk about how he couldn't of killed Mrs. Rogers or Marston, he obviously could since he was the mastermind killer. Everyone was so panicked and scared that they wouldn't notice him slip something in a few drinks. He thought his decisions through thoroughly as though he was writing a story, and I guess to him he was. He brought his favorite poem to life.

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    6. Preston, I 100% agree with you. Mr. Owen was an unidentified person so the guests technically got tricked because he was one of "guests" as well. His idea was very risky because he planned out every detail of someone's death by using his judge skills.I believe Mr. Owens confession was very well planned out. I agree with you about why Mr. Owen planned this plot, he wanted to act instead judge.

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  2. All of the guests that were invited to the island got a letter from a Mr. U. N. Owen. No one really quite knew who he was - none of them had actually met with him - but they all seemed to trust the letters (a terrible mistake in hindsight). I think it was kind of childish and elementary of the killer to make the name sound like "unknown" because if any of the guests were highly analytical, which I feel Vera totally was, they would have realized that it said "unknown" and they would have way sooner figured out that none of them knew who the host was. Anyways, I don't think that the confession letter was fitting. If Wargrave (U. N. Owen) wanted to stay consistent with the murders and his overall plan, he would have signed the letter, U. N. Owen. Every time you see a show or read about a murderer or a mad-man, they are 100% consistent. I think Wargrave created the plot to prove that he could. He could have just murdered the guests with no story line and quickly off them. But, he is more complex than that, and he knows he is! He wanted to prove to himself and the other guests that he was wittier, smarter, and more clever than anyone else was.

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    1. I somewhat agree with you about them trusting a letter from a stranger, but Vera's letter was speaking about giving her a job so why wouldn't she take it. The rest of your response is good and well thought out, Dane. I agree that Wargrave wanted to prove he could do it and that he was smarter than everyone else.

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  3. Dane, I didn't even think of Mr. U.N. Owen this way. Your response is very good and I can agree that Wargrave wants to prove that he is smarter than everyone else. I also think that he could have just killed everyone right away but chose not to because he likes to do things the hard way. This book was very unpredictable and I feel that anyone could have seen things in a different way.

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    1. I agree Dane, trusting the letters was just plain dumb. I didn't really think of the whole "staying consistent" thing but I do see where you are coming from. It does seem like he could've avoided a lot of trouble by just killing them outright but he wanted to show that he was smarter and he wanted them to feel the pain of knowing that they killed a certain person and they couldn't run from it any longer.

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